How to See Chrome Which Tabs that Slowing Down Your PC

How to See Chrome Which Tabs that Slowing Down Your PC

Google Chrome always be blamed for slowing down computer, even if you have a higher specifications. This browser has notoriously consume more memory (RAM) comparing to Firefox and Edge. Try to launch about 10 tabs and you will notice a significant degradation of performance at that time. To processing complex web pages, the system is relies on CPU. Hence, Chrome is basically hurting computer’s RAM and CPU when you using it.

Vast features and regular update from Google might be a influential reason for people to not move on from Chrome, even they suffered due to slowing down performance. Yet, I can say that not all web pages requires more RAM and CPU usage. Apparently only few of them employ more space which eventually decrease the speed.

So, how to spot heavy load tabs on Chrome? Instead of going towards Windows Task Manager, Chrome has recreated its processes management tool to help us quickly find unresponsive page.

How to See Chrome Which Tabs that Slowing Down Your PC

Step 1
In Chrome, click the button with three-dots icon located on top right of Chrome window. Hover the pointer to More tools and select Task manager. You can use combination key SHIFT+ESC instead.

How to See Chrome Which Tabs that Slowing Down Your PC

Step 2
Click the Memory footprint to sort in order of RAM use, and CPU for CPU use. From there you can easily notice what page that slowing down the machine dominantly. Click on the list and hit End process to kill the page.

TIP: If the temperature gets too hot, it most likely caused by something using your CPU resources fiercely. Meanwhile, if you you feel any lag or slower process during page rendering, Chrome tabs probably using a lot of RAM.

How to See Chrome Which Tabs that Slowing Down Your PC

The killed page would shows “Aw, Snap!” notice. It’s not displaying anything which means not devastate overall performance.

How to See Chrome Which Tabs that Slowing Down Your PC

So, what is the point? It’s basically close the tab, isn’t? Well, actually not. The URL is still remains and can be reloaded later if you want to access it back. But if you wanted to ‘store’ multiple tabs and then open it later, an extension named OneTab designed to kill all tabs on the Chrome window and convert it into a single page, leaving the URL alone.

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